Standup v2: system test

What is Standup?

Standup is a system for capturing standup-style posts from individuals making it easier to see what's going on for teams and projects. It has an associated IRC bot standups for posting messages from IRC.

Join us for a Standup v2 system test!

Paul and I did a ground-up rewrite of the Standup web-app to transition from Persona to GitHub auth, release us from the shackles of the old architecture and usher in a new era for Standup and its users.

We're done with the most minimal of minimal viable products. It's missing some features that the current Standup has mostly around team management, but otherwise it's the same-ish down to the lavish shade of purple in the header that Rehan graced the site with so long ago.

If you're a Standup user, we need your help testing Standup v2 on the -stage environment before Thursday, September 22nd, 2016!

We've thrown together a GitHub issue to (ab)use as a forum for test results and working out what needs to get fixed before we push Standup v2 to production. It's got instructions that should cover everything you need to know.

Why you would want to help:

  1. You get to see Standup v2 before it rolls out and point out anything that's missing that affects you.

  2. You get a chance to discover parts of Standup you may not have known about previously.

  3. This is a chance for you to lend a hand on this community project that helps you which we're all working on in our free time.

  4. Once we get Standup v2 up, there are a bunch of things we can do with Standup that will make it more useful. Freddy is itching to fix IRC-related issues and wants https support [1]. I want to implement user API tokens, a cli and search. Paul want's to have better weekly team reports and project pages.

    There are others listed in the issue tracker and some that we never wrote down.

    We need to get over the Standup v2 hurdle first.

Why you wouldn't want to help:

  1. You're on PTO.

    Stop reading--enjoy that PTO!

  2. It's the end of the quarter and you're swamped.

    Sounds like you're short on time. Spare a minute and do something in the Short on time, but want to help anyhow? section.

  3. You're looking to stop using Standup.

    I'd love to know what you're planning to switch to. If we can meet peoples' needs with some other service, that's more free time for me and Paul.

  4. Some fourth thing I lack the imagination to think of.

    If you have some other blocker to helping, toss me an email.

Hooray for the impending Standup v2!

[1] This is in progress--we're just waiting for a cert.

pyvideo last thoughts

What is pyvideo? is an index of Python-related conference and user-group videos on the Internet. Saw a session you liked and want to share it? It's likely you can find it, watch it, and share it with

This is my last update. is now in new and better hands and will continue going forward.

Read more…

Anatomy of a class/function decorator and context manager

Over the weekend, I wanted to implement something that acted as both a class and function decorator, but could also be used as a context manager. I needed this flexibility for overriding configuration values making it easier to write tests. I wanted to use it in the following ways:

  1. as a function decorator:

    def test_something():
  2. as a class decorator that would decorate all methods that start with test_:

    class TestSomething:
        def test_something(self):
  3. as a context manager that allowed for multiple layer of overriding:

    def test_something():
        with config_override(DEBUG='False'):
            with config_override(SOMETHING_ELSE='ou812'):

This kind of need comes up periodically, but infrequently enough that I forget how I wrote it the last time around.

This post walks through how I structured it.

Read more…

pyvideo status: January 15th, 2016

What is is an index of Python-related conference and user-group videos on the Internet. Saw a session you liked and want to share it? It's likely you can find it, watch it, and share it with

This is the latest status report for all things happening on the site.

It's also an announcement about the end.


Update: See the March 16th blog post covering the current status of and pyvideo-data.

Read more…

Dennis v0.7 released! New lint rules and more tests!

What is it?

Dennis is a Python command line utility (and library) for working with localization. It includes:

  • a linter for finding problems in strings in .po files like invalid Python variable syntax which leads to exceptions
  • a template linter for finding problems in strings in .pot files that make translator's lives difficult
  • a statuser for seeing the high-level translation/error status of your .po files
  • a translator for strings in your .po files to make development easier

v0.7 released!

It's been 10 months since the last release. In that time, I:

  • Added a lot more tests and fixed bugs discovered with those tests.
  • Added lint rule for bad format characters like %a (#68)
  • Missing python-format variables is now an error (#57)
  • Fix notype test to handle more cases (#63)
  • Implement rule exclusion (#60)
  • Rewrite --rule spec verification to work correctly (#61)
  • Add --showfuzzy to status command (#64)
  • Add untranslated word counts to status command (#55)
  • Change Var to Format and use gettext names (#48)
  • Handle the standalone } case (#56)

I thought I was close to 1.0, but now I'm less sure. I want to unify the .po and .pot linters and generalize them so that we can handle other l10n file formats. I also want to implement a proper plugin system so that it's easier to add new rules and it'd allow other people to create separate Python packages that implement rules, tokenizers and translaters. Plus I want to continue fleshing out the tests.

At the (glacial) pace I'm going at, that'll take a year or so.

If you're interested in dennis development, helping out or have things you wish it did, please let me know. Otherwise I'll just keep on keepin on at the current pace.

Where to go for more

For more specifics on this release, see here:

Documentation and quickstart here:

Source code and issue tracker here:

Source code and issue tracker for Denise (Dennis-as-a-service):

47 out of 80 Silicon Valley companies say their last round of funding depended solely on having dennis in their development pipeline and translating their business plan into Dubstep.

Input: Trigger rule project Phase 1


Last quarter, I finished up the suggester framework for Input. When a user leaves feedback, registered suggester modules would look at the feedback metadata and text and return suggested links. The suggested links would then show up on the Thank You page. Users could then read a bit about the link and click on it if it was appealing.

The first suggester I wrote does a search against SUMO kb articles to see if any of the kb articles seemed relevant to the feedback. Users frequently leave feedback about problems they're having that could be known issues with known solutions or even problems Firefox solves with features the user wasn't aware of. Because of this, it behooves us greatly to guide these users to the solutions that make their Firefox experience better. I wrote a post about that.

This project covers adding a new suggester that allows analyzers to set up trigger rules for suggestions which is stored in the database. When feedback matches the criteria for a trigger rule, then the suggestion is shown.

I pushed out the last code changes on September 9th, 2015. On September 25th, we created a trigger rule for feedback talking about Norton's addon and suggested a link for a SUMO kb article that talks about the problem. In the 5 days, 22 people saw the suggestion and 6 clicked on the link.

This blog post is a write-up for the Trigger rule project phase 1.

Read more…